Afghanistan: Bombing & Schools, The Taliban’s Effect on Education. Do not bow down to oppression. Continue school

By Valentina Horlander*

Kabul (Afghanistan). On the 8th of May, a Saturday, hundreds of young girls could be heard crying out in front of the Syed Al-Shahda’s school for girls.

Attacks in Kabul

In a mostly Shiite-Muslim neighborhood, there were reports of over 55 people dead and 150 injured.

Most of the dead and injured were 11 to 15 year old young girls who were students at the school.

The cause of the hysteria was three car bombs. The vehicles were filled to the brim with explosives.

The first bomb went off and then the two others followed shortly after.

Not only were people injured from the immediate explosion, but families report their daughters suffering from shrapnel tear through their bodies.

Many of those who suffered speculated those responsible for the attack, but it was the Interior of Ministry Affairs, Afghanistan’s government sector of law enforcement and civil order, that made a statement and blamed the attack on the Taliban.

 

This was not the first attack that has burdened the Kabul neighborhood of Dasht-E-Barchi.

Since 2018, there have been at least ten to twenty terrorist attacks coming to the Capitol, Kabul every year.

The violence has been escalating year after year, and with discussion about the United States withdrawing from Afghanistan under Biden, terrorist attacks will continue and increase as the years go on.

Not only are Afghani citizens concerned about the potential consequences of US withdrawal, these citizens also worry about the future of women’s education when the presence of the Taliban is growing and will remain unchecked.

As a result of this attack, it may be very difficult to keep girls in school. The bombing was a calculated attack designed to instill fear in not only the girls but also the families.

The car bombing can affect their likelihood of showing up to school to get an education.

The attack has not hindered the response from the community though.

Many victims, currently under the local hospital’s care, have come out in support of women’s rights, despite the attack on the school for girls.

One student, a seventeen-year-old girl injured from the bombing, told other young girls from the hospital bed, “Do not bow down to oppression. Continue school.”

One student, a seventeen-year-old girl injured from the bombing, told other young girls from the hospital bed, “Do not bow down to oppression. Continue school.”

Other families have had to unfortunately bury their daughters, but the girls who have survived are advocating for the continuing of women’s education.

The future for women’s rights and their right to an education in a patriarchal society like Afghanistan is unclear, but seeing these brave young women fighting for what they believe in is an inspiration and should put our own rights into perspective.

*South Asia Analyst

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